Category: fashionontumblr

chr-stos:

chr-stos:

Kaissan Ibrahima – Backstage at Bode S/S 2020

adamkatzsinding:

adamkatzsinding:

Backstage at S.R. STUDIO LA.CA., Spring/Summer 2020 http://bit.ly/2IpcgaG

marcjacobs: Aubrey Plaza at our THE MARC JACOB…

marcjacobs:

Aubrey Plaza at our THE MARC JACOBS Block Party in New York

Photographed by Cian Moore

serafino-finasero:

serafino-finasero:

Gloria Vanderbilt at 10 Gracie Square, New York City. Richard Avedon, 1956

rickowensonline:

rickowensonline:

JACK, FW19 LARRY MENS 

fashionweeksfaves:

fashionweeksfaves:

Versace Spring 2020 Menswear 

Photo

Photo

artruby:

artruby:

Hrafnhildur Arnardóttir / Shoplifter, Chromo Sapiens, at the Icelandic Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

Pride Spotlight: Ramzy Masri

Pride Spotlight: Ramzy Masri

In celebration of Pride Month, we’re spotlighting some fantastic LGBTQ+ creators who inspire with their work and actions. Here’s a unicorn artist, graphic designer, and creative director Ramzy Masri (pictured below). He makes the world better by seeing it through color, beauty, and yes, some of the most magical digital rainbows. Here’s more about Ramzy and his extraordinary visual world.

What does Pride mean to you?

Pride is a time to pause and reflect on how far the LGBTQ+ community has come and the work still to be done. This year with World Pride and Stonewall 50 there’s a lot to celebrate, though with the Straight Pride controversy and violence against trans women of color like Layleen Polanco its clear there’s still work to be done.

At its best, Pride is an outstretched hand: an open invitation to build community, to strengthen our chosen families and the bonds that we’ve formed as members of an oppressed community. It’s a time to organize, celebrate and appreciate the things that make us unique and different.

How can we continue to support the LGBTQ+ community?

This is a great question. My motto is “Every Day is Pride March” — mainly because we have to show up every day for ourselves and advocate for those who have less privilege, visibility and rights. There’s so much diversity in our community, from cis gay men to bisexuals, trans men and intersexed people, each with their own stories. We can all help to prioritize those stories and tell them during the rest of the year — not just during June. We’re a vulnerable community that experiences discrimination, hate and violence and we need allies who can bring our fight into the spotlight.

What are some concrete things folks can do to continue to support the LGBTQ+ community? Volunteer with LGBTQ+ organizations like SAGE, GLSEN, The Trevor Project, GSA, PFLAG, local shelters for LGBTQ+ homeless youth, retirement communities for LGBTQ+ elders. Advocate, volunteer or donate for politicians who champion our rights. Condemn and protest those who don’t. Support trans folks top or bottom surgeries — there are plenty of gofundme pages set up just for this cause. Go with a friend when they get tested. Help support people who might not have health insurance but have chronic illnesses or AIDS-related disease. Be present for LGBTQ+ youth, connect them to resources that may help them, fight for them when other adults don’t understand them. Use your voice, your love, your patience and your privilege for good, year round.

How did your love for rainbows commence?

It probably started with Lisa Frank. I’m non-binary so I’ve always wanted to express my femininity, but in grade school in the late 90s it wasn’t socially acceptable. Lisa Frank was like a window into another world and I coveted it. I’ve grown up to love what rainbows represent, specifically in the context of the LGBTQ+ community. I’m inspired by Gilbert Baker (who designed the very first pride flag) and in my way I’m trying to continue his legacy.

Do you ever translate your dreams into your work?

People often say my work is dreamy but unfortunately I don’t usually remember my own dreams! Dream clairvoyance runs in my family so I wish I could! I definitely daydream though, and my Instagram shows how I look at the world when I’m spacing out 👽

What’s the weirdest source of inspiration for you?

90’s toys! I guess it’s not that weird that I’m inspired by them but a lot of them were super weird. Like the rainbow koosh balls? And those tiny naked troll dolls with gems in their belly buttons? Furbies! My Little Pony! Slinkies! Those weird liquid tubes with the glitter in them! I don’t know what was in the water in the 90’s but it was a really awesome time to be a kid.

What makes you the happiest?

I’m happiest when I see people living their most authentic, weirdest, most insane, least-socially-acceptable selves. That’s what I hope my work does for people. It’s an invitation to connect to your inner child and discover a more vibrant tomorrow, one that honors the rainbow of gender and sexual expression.

Pride Spotlight: Sam Shannon

Pride Spotlight: Sam Shannon

In celebration of Pride Month, we’re spotlighting some fantastic LGBTQ+ creators who inspire with their work, actions, and visuals. Here’s spectacular multidisciplinary artist Sam Shannon (pictured below). She directs, creates magical moving images, and has completed dozens of successful notable brand collaborations. We caught up with Sam on Pride, love, and here creative influences. 

What does Pride mean to you?

To me pride starts from the inside with respect and love for yourself. Every person deserves to feel proud of who they are on an individual level and as a part of a community. In this current political climate I can’t think of a more important time to remind ourselves of how strong our collective voice is and to continue to fight for LGBTQ+ rights.

How can we continue to support the LGBTQ+ community?

To support is to respect. If you practice respect for all people and spread that mindset it’s the most emotionally impactful way to support the LGBTQ+ community.

What’s your most unforgettable professional memory?

I recently directed a music video for Conrad Clifton. We spent three nights in the dead of winter shooting outside with temperatures below 15. The project was by no means the fanciest and certainly not the biggest budget but it had such heart. Filmmaking is about the team and when you experience a feeling of collectively working towards a single vision despite physically taxing circumstances, there’s nothing better.

Who’s your biggest creative influence?

As a director I try to look outside the film world for influence. I find painters, sculptors, and college artists extremely influential when I’m looking to define a mood for a film. My favorites are Ellsworth Kelly, Agnis Martin, Richard Serra, Matisse, and John Baldessari. Since I work a lot in fashion I also have a huge catalog of photographers that I reference such as Viviane Sassen. Stephen Shore, Martin Parr, and Wim Wenders.

 What works brings you the most satisfaction?

I think there’s this idea that a director has to be this intimidating military type figure, punishing people into making good art and that a temperamental and aggressive attitude is somehow forgivable in the pursuit of success or real art. I’ve never found satisfaction in demanding subservience and refuse to believe that you need that type of attitude to be respected or successful. It’s a tricky balance but respect is something you earn by being decisive yet above all kind. Satisfaction comes when I feel that I’ve hit that balance.

 Is love important in art?

I think that art is love, to fall in love with a piece of art or to love making it. My goal with every film is to create an immersive experience, however short, for someone to truly get lost in. It can be something challenging or have a political or social agenda but overall I strive for something that feels honest, all encompassing, overwhelming, land leaves you with an unforgettable memory, like true love.